Stuttering

Young children typically go through a disfluent period between 2 – 3 years of age. As high as 80% of preschoolers exhibit stuttering-like dysfluencies, though most resolve without intervention. It is difficult for many parents to know when to seek professional help. The best way to determine if your child needs intervention is to contact a speech therapist.


Amy Holsten uses innovative and effective methods of treating stuttering in preschoolers, school-aged children, adolescents and adults. She has attended numerous trainings on the evaluation and treatment of stuttering in preschoolers through adults. Amy has also been trained in the Lidcombe Program of Early Stuttering Intervention. The Licombe Program is an early intervention approach developed at the Australian Stuttering Research Centre at The University of Sydney. It uses a direct method to treating stuttering in which the parents are taught a systematic behavioral approach to decreasing stuttering in their young child.


Amy uses a “whole family” approach to treating stuttering in children. She believes the most effective way of improving fluency and developing a healthy attitude about speaking involves direct parent involvement in their child’s therapy. Parents and children are empowered with strategies that can ensure the child can say what he wants to say, when he wants to say it.


The Lidcombe Program of Early Stuttering Intervention:

sydney.edu.au/health-sciences/asrc/clinic/parents/lidcombe.shtml


The Stuttering Foundation:

www.stutteringhelp.org